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OM RATNA TRAYAYA MANTRA – Homage to the Triple Gem

Posted by on Jul 31, 2012

Tibetan Buddhist Yogic Mantra to Honor Avalokiteśvara, the Buddha of Infinite Compassion.

Nepalese Avalokiteshvara

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In China, this Buddha is known as Guānshìyīn Púsà (觀世音菩薩). Avalokiteśvara is the holder of infinite wisdom – the lotus bearer. Other forms of this Buddha are Guanyin, or Kwanyin. In Tibet, the Buddha of compassion is called Jainraisig. It is thought that this Buddha has reincarnated into his Holiness the Dalai Lama. When translated from its original Sanskrit, Avalokiteshvara means that who can look down on the world’s lamentations. Loka, which is one of the symbols of the buddha’s name translates more correctly; however, to mean space not world, so perceived correctly, the Buddha of Compassion helps us to hold a space for compassionate thoughts for ourselves and for others.

This beautiful mantra is like a tone poem. It was meant to remove karmic impressions for the practitioner who repeats it mindfully.

Here is an approximation of translation of the mantra  into the English language:

Namo Ratna Trayāya, (homage to the triple gem)

Namah Aryā Jñāna Sāgara, (homage to the ocean of noble wisdom)

Vairocana, (the illuminator)
Vyuharajāya (to the king of the host [also the name of a bodhisattva])

Tathagatāya, (to the tathagata)

Arhate, (to the arhat)

Samyak sambuddhāya, (to the perfectly awakened one)

Nama Sarva TathagatebhyaH (homage to all tathagatas)

ArhatebhyaH, (to the arhats)

Samyak SambuddhebhyaH, (to the fully and perfectly awakened ones)

Nama Aryā Avalokiteshvarāya (homage to noble Avalokitesvara)

Bodhisattvāya, (to the bodhisattva)

Maha Sattvāya, (to the great being)

Maha Karunikāya, (to the greatly compassionate one)

Tadyatha (thus):
Om Dhāra Dhāra, (bearing)

Dhīri Dhīri, (firm)

Dhuru Dhuru (bearing a burden)

Itte Vatte, (??)

Cale Cale, (moving, trembling, shaking)

Pracale Pracale, (moving, trembling, shaking)

Kusume (in flower)

Kusume 
Vare, (in the circumference)

Hili Mili (??)

Citi Jvālam, (blazing understanding)

Apanaye Svāhā. (leading away) hail! “

Alternative translation:
“NAMO RATNA TRAYAYA / NAMO ARYA JNANA SAGARA, VAIROCHANA / BYUHARA JARA TATHAGATAYA / ARAHATE SAMYAKSAM BUDDHAYA / NAMO SARWA TATHAGATE BHYAY ARHATA BHYAH / SAMVAKSAM BUDDHE BHVAH / NAMO AVALOKITE / SHORAYA BODHISATTVAYA / MAHA SATTVAYA / MAHA KARUNIKAYA / TADYATA / OM DARA DARA / DIRI DIRI / DURU DURU / ITTE WE / ITTE CHALE CHALE / PURACHALE PURACHALE KUSUME KUSUMA WA RE / ILI MILLI CHITI JVALAM / APANAVE SHOHA 


General Translation: 1. Adoration the noble Avalokitesvara, bodhisattva, the great compassionate one. 2. Having paid adoration to One who Dispels all Fears, O noble Avalokitesvara, to You adoration, O Nilakantha. 3. I shall enunciate the ‘heart’ dharani which ensures all purposes, is pure and invincible for all beings, and which purifies the path of existence. 4. Thus: Lord of Effulgence, the World-Transcending One. Come, come, great bodhisattva, descend, descend. Bear in mind my heart-dharani. Do do the work. Hold fast, oh Victor, oh Great Victor. Hold on, hold on, oh Lord of the Dharani. Move, move oh my immaculate image, come come. Destroy every poison. Quick, bear in mind, quick, quick, descend, descend. Being enlightened, being enlightened, enlighten me, enlighten me. Oh merciful Nilakantha appear unto me. To you who eyes us, hail. To the Great Siddha hail. To the Great Siddha in Yoga hail. To Nilakantha hail. To the Boar-feaced hail. 5. Adoration to the Triple Gem. Adoration to the noble Avalokitesvara bodhisattva, hail. “

2) “Avalokiteśvaraikadaśamukha Dhāraṇī (Eleven Faced Avalokitesvara Dhāranī)
This dhāraṇī stems from the Eleven-Faced Avalokitesvara Heart Dharani Sutra and is often somewhat incorrectly referred to as the Great Compassion Mantra, e.g. in popular recordings by Imee Ooi and Ani Choying Dolma. More specific denominations of this dharani are Avalokiteśvaraikadaśamukhadhāraṇī or Ārya Ekādaśa-mukha Dhāraṇī in Sanskrit, and Eleven Faced Avalokitesvara Dharani in English.

The chanting of this dhāraṇī is perhaps the most frequently performed Buddhism song by Chinese-speaking musicians. It is often falsely named Tibetan Great Compassion Mantra (藏传大悲咒) or The Great Compassion Mantra in Sanskrit (梵音大悲咒) in both Chinese and Taiwanese recordings. Since this dhāraṇī is told by the Eleven-Faced Avalokitesvara, an esoteric bodhisattva in Tibetan Buddhism, some people believe that it is equivalent to the Great Compassion Mantra in Mahayana Buddhism. This is why it is often called Tibetan Great Compassion Mantra (藏传大悲咒). However, this opinion is not accepted by most Mahayana Buddhists.


References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avalokite%C5%9Bvara
© 2012 Christina Sarich is a musician, India-trained yogi, humanitarian and freelance writer who channels many hours of having studied Lao Tzu, Paramahansa Yogananda, Rob Brezny, Miles Davis, and Tom Robbins into interesting tidbits to help you Wake up Your Sleepy Little Head, and See the Big Picture. Her blog is http://yogaforthenewworld.blogspot.com/
This article is offered under creative common license. It is okay to republish it with all links intact and author bio included.


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